You may write me down in history With your….. I rise.(Maya Angelou) ‘Personal Response’ By Runa Sayeed (Editor)

Still, I Rise by Maya Angelou, one of those poems that impacted me the most.holds importance in my life as confidence in who I am as well as my values are something that I have, and continue to, struggle with.  The poem begins by the persona addressing their tormentors, speaking of the confidence they have in them self that the oppressor will never be able to minimise. The speaker accuses her subject of spreading “bitter and “twisted” lies, for instance, and of pushing her down into the “dirt.”    and end with As long as I can continue to hold this as true no matter what may happen I will continue to rise.
Poem ‘Still I Rise”
You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I’ll rise.
Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
‘Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.
Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I’ll rise.
Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.
Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don’t you take it awful hard
‘Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines
Diggin’ in my own back yard.
You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.
Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I’ve got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?
Out of the huts of history’s shame
I rise
Up from a past that’s rooted in pain
I rise
I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.
Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise.
Maya Angelou, born April 4, 1928, as Marguerite Johnson in St. Louis, was raised in segregated rural Arkansas. She was a poet, historian, author, actress, playwright, civil-rights activist, producer and director.

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